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20110720
20110720
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
of scotland yard who resigned sunday. the hearings comes after ten arrests and a series of resignatns as fallout from the phone hacking scandal grows. with me john burns, ian katz, deputy he had tortd of the guardian and david karr of the new york city times and sh tyrangiel edito of newsweek. ian katz, what does this day whh rupert murdochcalled the humblest day of his life. what does it change and where do we go from here? >> well, it's not a day we learn an awful lot of significant things. if anything the clearest lesson is wendy dang has a formidable right hook but it was a day of quite striking theatre i think. for in who sits in this country the idea of rupert murdoch who two weeks ago was the most powerful person.country being hauled into parliament to answer questions is prett pretty extraordinary and we had the dialog of him saying it was the humblest day of his lif that w pretty striking. the interesting thing is he and james murdoch came in saying sorry and contrition if you lied but the message was we're sorry but it wasn't else, was someone else's fault and that's the bi
of scotland yard-- sir paul stephenson-- also denied wrongdoing. he said he was embarrassed that he'd hired a former "news of the world" executive, neil wallis, as a public relations consultant. wallis has now been arrested. >> i had no reason to connect wallis with phone hacking. i had no reason to doubt his impropriety. nothing had come to my attention. i had no knowledge of the previous inquiry, and i had no reason to enquire of the previous inquiry, and i had been given assurances by a senior grade chief constable that actually there was nothing new. >> brown: away from the hearings, scotland yard announced today it found no outside involvement in the death of sean hoare, a former "news of the world" reporter who'd been an early whistleblower in the scandal. hoare was found dead monday at his home north of london. more now on today's hearings and the murdoch media empire. we're joined, from london, by john burns of "the new york times," and from new york, by david folkenflik, who covers the media for npr. so, john burns, what struck you most about the murdoch's message today? >> well, i
of the metropolitan police, refer to as scotland yard, have worked for news international advising them in a pr capacity. what worked for the government. there is this kind of seedy revolving door between the police and as powerful media company. as i said, when it is calms down a little, police need to look at self-policing, especially with regard to what people do after they left. but it also seems to be an issue plane corruption. police were being bribed by journalists to provide information. that could end up, as the caller said, it has not been that big a part of the story yet. we could have police facing disciplinary hearings if not criminal prosecutions. host: do you see potential of this bringing down the camden government? guest: -- cameron government? guest: people are beginning to think that. if he had an election in six months, it would be serious. it does not look very good. the scandal last year broke a lot of trust in politicians. now you have got a prime minister who appointed someone, his former communications director, a former editor of "news of the world" when the hacking wa
international parliame looked at scotland yard's initial phone hacking investigation back in 2005 and 2006. the report rips the chief investigator who left the police force and eventually took a job at news international. it slams news international for its "deliberate attempts to block police." david cameron called parliament into special session to discuss the phone hacking scandal. cameron and his predecessors have been criticized for their ties to news corp. chairman rupert murdoch and the people who run his london media operation. >> the public expects is not petty political point scoring but a -- what they want, what they deserve is concerted action to rise to the level of events and pledge to work together to sort this issue out once and for all. and it is in that spirit that i commend this statement to the house. >> in this country, a new debt ceiling compromise seems to be getting traction in washington. six senators, three republicans, and three democrats are offering a plan to cut the nation's debt by about $3.7 trillion over the next decade. it includes spending cuts a
of the world" owner news international parliament looked at scotland yard's initial phone hacking investigation back in 2005 and 2006. the report rips the chief investigator who left the police force and eventually took a job at news international. it slams news international for its "deliberate attempts to block police." david
a substantial volume of information to the scotland yard, and in return, he received dozens of items of confidential and for action from the police and that is the obligation. >> most journalists who work for the crime editor or half a working relationship and their particular police force. >> when our report was published in early 2010 was when you were chief executive of news international, and there were certain things we're obviously we found that the evidence from the people from the news international was unsatisfactory and collecting in nisha we refer to in the reports and we felt it was inconceivable that he was a reporter as passed on to that we refer to the e-mail and all that kind of stuff. when you were the chief executive of news international at the time that report was published did you read the report we published? >> yes, i did. i'm not saying i read every word but a large majority. i read the criticisms that were addressed to the company, and i can only hope that from the evidence that you heard from us today that we have really stepped up our investigation and that
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)